Introducing “Muslim Girls DTF” Web Series And It’s Not What You Think. Literally

Introducing “Muslim Girls DTF” Web Series

And It’s Not What You Think. Literally

With a title like “Muslim Girls DTF,” it’s hard not to click the link to find out more — hoping it’s not some sick fetish video of course…

And praise be to Allah, it definitely isn’t porn.

It’s better.

You see, pornography is simply a depiction of erotic behaviors intended to stir arousal. This web series goes way deeper (pun intended) with “DTF” cleverly standing for “Discuss Their Faith.” And that’s way more intimate than cheap erotica filmed in a basement.

As a Muslim woman myself, it sometimes feels like everyone else has an opinion about us — often without even having had the chance to hear from us. Heck, there’s even a Guide to Dating a Muslim Girl… written by a non-Muslim! Wtf?

And that’s where Muslim Girls DTF comes in.

This provocative new web series was serendipitously helmed after creators and producers Aizzah Fatima and Atheer Yacoub met on Twitter when Aizzah shared this frustration:

“Dear white writers and others too, you know who you are. Stop writing Muslim female characters with or without hijab named Fatima. We have other names too in the Muslim world, I promise.”

After that, many Muslim women comics and comedy writers started tagging each other and responding, bonding over how they were being portrayed without being a part of the conversation. And once they realized that a good amount of them were in New York City, they decided to get together to create content along with writers Rokhsane Zadeh and Romaissaa Benzizoune, and Muslim DP Jude Chehab.

Atheer, stand-up comedian and host of The No Fly List Podcast (who just released a half hour special on Comedy Central Arabia) shares that, “In a world of mostly straight white men doing comedy, I wanted to collaborate with other funny Muslim women who have things to say and are maybe also disappointing their parents with their career choices…”

Aizzah, who also penned the hit award-winning one woman play Dirty Paki Lingerie (which the Wall Street Journal called a play that “Breaks Down Stereotypes of Muslim Women in America”) came at it from a different angle. “I grew up being the haram police in a very small town in Mississippi. With this show I wanted to rectify that by showcasing all the diverse female voices that exist within my community on important issues women deal with all the time such as nose jobs, body hair, and dick size. And I’m a selfish bastard who wanted to create more work for myself.”

The bite-sized segments they’ve created do just that. In a series of quick cuts that highlight the upbeat banter you’d only expect behind closed doors, it finally asks a fierce and funny group of ladies what they have to say about conversations happening around them in the media, while weighing in on issues from daily life.

And their answers are hilarious:

“The way Muslims are portrayed in media is shit.” “My goal was to be the first Muslim president of the United States. But you know, Barack Obama beat me to it.” “I mean, what’s Tinder really? It’s an arrangement [marriage]!”

But also painstakingly true:

“I was always shoved into a category… I was always just the ‘Muslim girl’ or the ‘Arabic girl.’ I was never just me.”

While these women fall under the collective identity of Muslimhood, each member of the diverse group has an authentic opinion which feels completely unique to them. It’s definitely not a one-size-fits-all religion, and they don’t let you forget that.

When asked why she gravitated towards this project, Rokhsane Zadeh commented on how awful it felt to be asked to wear a hijab in auditions, and the special feeling she had when this was understood by her peers. “We all really fight to be here. People like us are rarely up there on screen, so all these women have a lot to overcome to get there. It was amazing to be with women who all felt it and knew how important this was.”

Cast member Nina Kharoufeh (SiriusXM) comments that, “This project is soooo important! It’s crucial that we show Muslim women are just like everyone else. We shop, drink coffee, eat sushi. We are basic just like the rest of America!”

The series is produced by Adam Yeremian (Children of the Mountain, Hurricane Bianca, Are You Glad I’m Here) through US based production company, ProMedia NYC, with Fatima and Yacoub also producing. The series cast includes all funny Muslim ladies: Romaissaa Benzizoune (Freelance Writer), Negin Farsad (Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, NPR), Aizzah Fatima (High Maintenance, HBO), Nina Kharoufeh (SiriusXM), Nidia P. Manzoor (Shugs & Fats, Gotham award), Atheer Yacoub (Comedy Central Arabia), Rokhsane Zadeh (Freeland Writer), Maysoon Zayid (Sanctuary,TNT). The first season also had a diverse crew, and was shot by Muslim female cinematographer, Jude Chehab.

And after watching the pilot webisode, all I can say is: FINALLY.

It’s about time that we have an accurate and authentic representation of issues the sisterhood faces — beyond the nominal questions and surface level coverage we usually get.

In a world saturated with negative opinions, stereotypes, and blatant misunderstandings of who Muslim women are and what they represent, this webseries is a refreshingly authentic portrayal of the realities we face.

What I also appreciate – and don’t take this lightly – is how brave these women are for putting themselves out there. It is not easy, especially being judged by society on both sides, ready to pounce at every edgy word you say. Take it from me.

I’m genuinely thrilled from what I’ve seen so far, and I’m looking forward to the topics they’ll cover throughout the season like: body hair, pork, sex talk (or lack thereof), stereotypes, dumb questions people ask, and dating!

There’s one thing for sure — these DTF Muslims will keep you on your toes. Which is just what this world needs. Let’s keep that in the conversation moving forward.

You can catch the series on YouTube and social media today (which just so happens to be International Muslim Women’s Day!)

Reem Edan

Reem is a 26 year-old Muslim-American comedian.

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